All Saints Church

All Saints Church

The church of ALL SAINTS stands on a hillock north-west of Marden Street and is approached by a flagged stone path. It is built of sarsen rubble with freestone dressings and has a chancel, nave with south porch, and west tower. The nave is of 12thcentury origin and retains the original chancel arch and south doorway, both of which are elaborately decorated. The chancel was probably enlarged in the 14th century and has at least one window of that date. The Perpendicular tower, which is entirely of freestone, has diagonal buttresses with pinnacles at the offsets and belfry windows with ogee hoodmoulds. It is connected to the nave by a tall tower arch.



The chancel was reported out of repair in 1556 (fn. 150) and subsequently extensive repairs and alterations were carried out to remedy structural faults which have been attributed to poor foundations. (fn. 151) The upper stage of the tower was removed and the nave walls were largely rebuilt to include new windows, probably in the 17th century. At about the same time a timber-framed porch was built against the south doorway. The tower was rebuilt and heightened under the direction of C. E. Ponting in 1885, (fn. 152) and in the course of further 19th-century restorations tracery was inserted in the nave windows, the east wall was rebuilt to incorporate a new window in 14th-century style, and the porch was replaced in stone. The nave roof appears to be of the 19th century but may be a copy of its late-15th-century predecessor. The plain octagonal font is probably of 13th-century date. The early-17th-century pulpit retains its original backboard and tester. The royal arms, dated 1772, hang above the chancel arch. The north-west nave window, representing St. Peter and St. Paul, was designed and made by Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Kettlewell and inserted in 1958. (fn. 153) The chancel contains some wall tablets to members of the Hayward family.

The parish retained a chalice in 1553. (fn. 154) In 1891 and 1970 the plate comprised a chalice given by the Revd. Francis Simpson in 1812, a paten, given also in 1812 by John Young (d. 1837), and a flagon of silver parcel gilt given by the Revd. James Bliss (curate c. 1844). (fn. 155) There were three bells in 1553. In the early 20th century, as in 1970, there was a peal of five, of which the third, dated 1627, was cast by John Lott of Warminster. The treble, tenor, and fourth, all of 18th-century date, are also by local founders, while the second was added in 1886. (fn. 156) Registrations of baptisms run from 1685, burials from 1687, and marriages (lacking 1750–3) from 1693. (fn. 157)

Comments